Assessment – the name you know

Assessment is a dirty word.  It has become a Cargo Cult

Its easy for a teacher to hear assessment and see record keeping. The Cargo Cult of paperwork is adopted and not the “why”.

Eddie Murphy: A Distinguished Gentleman

Now colleagues are defending Levels as a helpful way of providing statistics on progress. That is lunacy.  It’s a cunning plan of Baldrickian proportions.

Assessment for Learning  isn’t a black box of National Strategies hocus pocus, it is the very core of the being of a teacher:

Teaching is :

Identifying what a child can do and working out which skill or piece of knowledge they need next.

telephone wireIts is then about communicating those needs to all the people involved in the child’s life.

No grids, no reds greens or blues….that’s the stuff of managerialism

Go back to first principles the question OFSTED ask is:

How do you know that all children are making [good] progress?

They do not ask:

How good are your record keeping processes?

You need robust systems to save time, not because OfSTED want them.

SO – from now on:

Benchmarks could well be:

  • Reception
  • Year 1
  • Year 2
  • Year 4
  • Year 6
  • Year 8/9

They will probably be Nationalised standardised tests.

The question for a school is now:

How do you know children are making progress between benchmarks?

As experts in your field, select the most valuable framework to support your judgements.  Beware the trap of learned helplessness.  APP writing is helpful, but maybe too detailed…

For computing:

Watch the work of Mark Dorling his map of computing is superb.

Either way, consider a move to create students of their own progress, not drones looking for the next hoop to jump through.

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3 thoughts on “Assessment – the name you know

  1. Pingback: The power of words – think Ronseal | The Grinch Manifesto

  2. Pingback: Part Three, in which the market understood & the size of the sales problem is explored | The Grinch Manifesto

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